Biden’s National Security Strategy Is Now Up to the Political Challenge

Biden’s Agenda Hangs in the Balance if Republicans Take Congress

Over the weekend, Vice President Joe Biden made a speech outlining his national security policy agenda and offering a candid look at the threats facing America. The speech was billed as a “roadmap” for future defense issues—a vision statement whose substance remains to be defined by the political debate over where and how to spend the nation’s defense dollars.

But as it turns out, Biden’s blueprint is now up to the political challenge of actually getting through Congress—a challenge he must win if he’s to meet with any hope of succeeding as he did on his two previous presidential campaigns.

The road ahead will be a long one, filled with obstacles and distractions. But in the end, Biden faces the same problem as every president before him: The American people—and the political system—are much better at choosing their leaders than their presidents are.

Biden may not be the obvious choice for the second highest office in the land. It’s still too early for the Democratic primary polls to tell definitively where he stands in the race, and there’s no clear front-runner in the Republican race either.

But if he wins the nomination, Biden will need to make his case in a highly-skewed primary, and he must navigate through an unforgiving political environment, where there is no shortage of critics and no shortage of enemies.

Biden has made his intentions clear: He wants a more robust national defense and national security budget, and he wants to make America less vulnerable to foreign threats. But to get there, he will have to make common cause with Republicans: the party that has shown itself more comfortable with the concept of endless wars, and a foreign policy that’s more hostile to America’s security interests than its supporters would like to admit.

Biden will need to make common cause with Republicans: the party that has shown itself more comfortable with the concept of endless wars, and a foreign policy that’s more hostile to America’s security interests than its supporters would like

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