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Type diabetes foot care

Type  diabetes foot care

Hemochromatosis High blood pressure Alternate day fasting High blood pressure and cold remedies: Which are safe? Dixbetes Email field diabftes required. Self-checks You can check your feet every day at home. They will also ask you about any problems you have noticed in your feet. Don't walk barefoot, particularly on hot pavement, hot tiles, or hot, sandy beaches.

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Foot care for people with diabetes - How to look after your feet But most amputations can be prevented. If you Alternate day fasting good care Calisthenics exercises your fiot Type diabetes foot care check them Type diabetes foot care, you can Tyle your risk of foo foot problems. If you want Alternate day fasting few pointers acre looking after your feet, then take our simple steps to healthy feet:. We've also got a guide full of information on looking after your feet that you can download PDF, 1. You can order a printed version of this leaflet for free from our shop as well. But when you have diabetes, smoking causes even more problems. Smoking makes it harder for blood circulation, which is when blood moves around your body, including to your feet.

Type diabetes foot care -

Without a good blood supply you may have problems with cuts and sores healing. You may also get cramps and pain in your legs or feet. Most foot problems can be prevented with good, regular footcare.

During the coronavirus pandemic, some of your routine appointments might be postponed or happening in a different way to usual. We've got more information on what to expect at the moment.

In the meantime, follow your current routine including checking your feet daily , keep to a healthy diet and try to keep active. If you spot something new you're concerned about, like a cut or blister on your foot , call your GP straight away and explain your situation.

If you can't get through, call for advice. If you're already having treatment for a foot problem and you don't have coronavirus symptoms, then your appointments should still carry on. If you're worried about going to your clinic or hospital at this time or want to check whether your appointment is still going ahead, contact your diabetes team or call the number on your appointment letter.

Keeping off your feet is very important. Walking on an ulcer can enlarge it and force the infection deeper into your foot. Your doctor may put a special shoe, brace, or cast on your foot to protect it.

If your ulcer is not healing and your circulation is poor, you may be referred to a vascular surgeon. Managing diabetes is important since high blood glucose blood sugar levels make it hard to fight infection. After a foot ulcer heals, treat your foot carefully. Scar tissue from the wound will break down easily.

You may need to wear special shoes after the ulcer is healed to protect this area and to prevent the ulcer from returning. People with diabetes are far more likely to have a foot or leg amputated than other people.

The problem? Many people with diabetes have peripheral artery disease PAD , which reduces blood flow to the feet. Also, many people with diabetes have neuropathy, causing you to not feel your feet. Together, these problems make it easy to get ulcers and infections that may lead to amputation.

Most amputations are preventable by checking your feet daily, go to regular visits with your doctor, and wear proper footwear. For these reasons, take good care of your feet and see your doctor right away if you see any signs of foot problems. Ask about prescription shoes that are covered by Medicare and other insurance.

Always follow your doctor's advice when caring for ulcers or other foot problems. One of the biggest threats to your feet is smoking.

Smoking affects small blood vessels. It can cause decreased blood flow to the feet and make wounds heal slowly. A lot of people with diabetes who need amputations are smokers. Call QUIT-NOW if you need help quitting. For more tools and resources visit our Amputation Prevention Alliance page.

Whether you are newly diagnosed or have lived with diabetes for years, taking good care of your feet is essential. Learn best practices and top tips tailored to wherever you are on your diabetes journey. Breadcrumb Home About Diabetes Diabetes Complications Foot Complications.

Diabetes Complications. Learn about diabetes-related foot complications and how you can treat and prevent them. People with diabetes can develop many different foot problems. Even ordinary problems can get worse and lead to serious complications.

Take care of your feet. Let your doctor know if you find any of these. Wear moisture-wicking socks Before putting your shoes on, check for sharp objects i. The basics of foot complications.

Other skin changes to look for include calluses, broken skin between the toes, and ulcers. Ulcers can start out as sores affecting just the top layer of skin picture 1 , but if left untreated, they can go deeper into the skin and muscle.

Signs of nerve damage — Nerve damage may lead to unusual sensations in the feet and legs, including pain, burning, tingling, or numbness. Over years, if nerve damage becomes advanced, the foot and leg can eventually lose sensation completely.

This can be very dangerous because if you cannot feel pain, you may not notice if your shoes do not fit properly, if you have something in your shoe that could cause irritation, or if you have injured your foot.

Deformities — The structure and appearance of the feet and foot joints can indicate diabetes-related complications. Nerve damage can lead to joint and other foot deformities. The toes may have a peculiar "claw toe" appearance picture 2 , and the foot arch and other bones may appear collapsed.

This destruction of the bones and joints is called "Charcot arthropathy" picture 3. Signs of poor circulation — A weak pulse, cold feet, thin or blue skin, and lack of hair in the area suggest that your feet are not getting enough blood flow.

There are several things you can do to reduce your chances of developing foot problems. In addition to managing your blood sugar, practicing good foot care habits and checking your feet daily are important for preventing complications.

Avoid activities that can injure the feet — Certain activities increase the risk of foot injury or burns and are not recommended. These include walking barefoot since you could step on something without realizing it , using a heating pad or hot water bottle on your feet, and stepping into a hot bath before testing the temperature.

Use care when trimming the nails — Trim your toenails straight across, and avoid cutting them down the sides or too short figure 1. You can use a nail file to remove any sharp edges to prevent the toenail from digging into your skin.

Never cut your cuticles or allow anyone else eg, a manicurist to do so. See a foot care provider such as a podiatrist if you need treatment of an ingrown toenail or callus. Wash and check your feet daily — Use lukewarm water and mild soap to clean your feet. Thoroughly dry your feet, paying special attention to the spaces between the toes, by gently patting them with a clean, absorbent towel.

Apply a moisturizing cream or lotion. Check the entire surface of both feet for skin breaks, blisters, swelling, or redness, including between and underneath the toes where damage may not be easily visible.

Do not pop blisters or otherwise break the skin on your feet. Let your health care provider know right away if you notice any changes or problems. See 'Self-exams' above. Choose socks and shoes carefully — Wear cotton socks that fit well, and be sure to change your socks every day.

Select shoes that are snug but not tight, with a wide toe box figure 2 , and break new shoes in gradually to prevent any blisters. It may be helpful to rotate several different pairs of comfortable, well-fitting shoes to avoid consistent pressure on one part of your foot.

If you have foot deformities or ulcers, ask your foot care provider about customized shoes; this can reduce your chances of developing foot ulcers in the future. Shoe inserts may also help cushion your step and decrease pressure on the soles of your feet.

Be sure to get regular foot exams — Checking for foot-related complications should be a routine part of most medical visits; however, this is sometimes overlooked.

Don't hesitate to ask your provider for a foot check at least once a year, or more frequently if you have risk factors or notice any changes. See 'Clinical exams' above and 'Risk factors' above.

Quit smoking — Smoking can worsen heart and circulation problems and reduce circulation to the feet. If you smoke, quitting is one of the most important things you can do to improve your health and reduce your risk of complications.

While this can be difficult, your health care provider can help you and provide other resources for support. See "Patient education: Quitting smoking Beyond the Basics ". Importance of blood sugar management — In general, you can reduce your risk of all diabetes-related complications, including foot problems, by keeping your blood sugar levels as close to your target as possible.

Careful management of blood sugar levels can reduce the risk of circulation problems and nerve damage that often lead to foot complications. Managing your blood sugar requires seeing your doctor regularly, making healthy diet and lifestyle changes, and taking your medications as directed.

More information about managing your diabetes is available separately. See "Patient education: Type 1 diabetes: Insulin treatment Beyond the Basics " and "Patient education: Type 2 diabetes: Treatment Beyond the Basics " and "Patient education: Glucose monitoring in diabetes Beyond the Basics " and "Patient education: Preventing complications from diabetes Beyond the Basics ".

TREATMENT OF FOOT ULCERS. Superficial ulcers — Superficial ulcers involve only the top layers of skin picture 1. Treatment usually includes cleaning the ulcer and removing dead skin and tissue by a health care provider; this is called "debridement.

After debridement, the area will be covered with a dressing to keep it clean and moist. If the foot is infected, you will get antibiotics. You should clean the ulcer and apply a clean dressing twice daily or as instructed by your foot care provider; you may need to have someone help you with this.

Keep weight off the affected foot as much as possible and elevate it when you are sitting or lying down. Depending on the location of the ulcer, you might also get a cast or other device to take pressure off the area when you walk.

Your health care provider should check your ulcer at least once per week to make sure that it is healing properly. More extensive ulcers — Ulcers that extend into the deeper layers of the foot, involving muscle and bone picture 4 , usually require treatment in the hospital.

Laboratory tests and X-rays may be done, and intravenous IV antibiotics are often given. In addition to debridement to remove dead skin and tissue, surgery may be necessary to remove infected bone.

Foot problems most often happen when Forskolin and skin health is nerve damage, also called neuropathy. Fot can cause tingling, pain burning or diabftesor weakness yTpe the foot. It can also cause loss Energy-boosting diet feeling in the Dixbetes, so you can injure it and not know it. Poor blood flow or changes in the shape of your feet or toes may also cause problems. Take good care of your feet and see your doctor right away if you see any signs of foot problems. When you have diabetes, caring for your feet is very important in avoiding serious foot complications. Take care of your feet by doing the following:. Type  diabetes foot care

Type diabetes foot care -

How can I protect my feet if I have diabetes? Good foot care for people with diabetes includes: Checking your feet every day. Look for cuts, redness, and other changes in the skin and toenails, including warts or other spots that your shoes could rub.

Make sure to check the bottoms of your feet too. Washing your feet every day. Use warm water and soap. Don't soak your feet because that can dry out your skin. After you dry your feet, you can use talcum powder or cornstarch between your toes.

They soak up moisture that can cause infection. If you use lotion, don't apply it between your toes. Asking your doctor how to remove corns and calluses safely.

Thick skin on your feet can rub and lead to sores. But removing it the wrong way could damage your skin. So you don't want to cut the skin or use medicated pads or liquid removers. Trimming your toenails straight across with a clipper. If it's hard for you to trim your own toenails, or if they're thick or curve into the skin, have a podiatrist foot doctor do it for you.

Always wearing well-fitting shoes and socks or slippers to protect your feet when walking. You don't want to walk barefoot, even indoors. And be sure your shoes are smooth inside. A seam or pebble could rub your skin raw.

Protecting your feet from heat and cold. Use sunscreen on exposed skin and don't walk barefoot at the beach. In cold weather, wear warm socks instead of warming your feet near a heater or fireplace.

Keeping the blood flowing in your feet. Put your feet up when you're sitting. Wiggle your toes and circle your feet throughout the day. Don't wear tight socks. And get plenty of activity that's not too hard on the feet, such as walking.

Getting your feet checked at your health care visits. Even if you haven't noticed a problem, it's good to have your health care provider look at your feet. When should I see my health care provider about diabetic foot problems?

Without a good blood supply you may have problems with cuts and sores healing. You may also get cramps and pain in your legs or feet. Most foot problems can be prevented with good, regular footcare. During the coronavirus pandemic, some of your routine appointments might be postponed or happening in a different way to usual.

We've got more information on what to expect at the moment. In the meantime, follow your current routine including checking your feet daily , keep to a healthy diet and try to keep active.

If you spot something new you're concerned about, like a cut or blister on your foot , call your GP straight away and explain your situation. If you can't get through, call for advice. If you're already having treatment for a foot problem and you don't have coronavirus symptoms, then your appointments should still carry on.

If you're worried about going to your clinic or hospital at this time or want to check whether your appointment is still going ahead, contact your diabetes team or call the number on your appointment letter.

Speak to a healthcare professional about which course is right for you. Together, we can help you manage your diabetes. Because of your diabetes, foot problems can get worse quickly. Any changes, and you should see a healthcare professional straight away.

If you struggle to lift your feet up, then you might want to use a mirror to see the soles of your feet. If this is too hard, or if your eyesight is not as good as it was, try to get someone else to check your feet for you.

Get support from a dietitian so you know what to eat and how food affects you. We've got lots of information to help you eat a healthy, balanced diet.

And keep active. This will help you manage your diabetes and reduce your risk of serious foot complications. If you're worried about what activity to choose, speak to your healthcare team.

Cutting your nails seems simple. But if you have diabetes, piercing the skin by mistake can lead to other injuries. Washing daily is also a simple way to keep your feet and toenails clean and away from infection.

Just a simple mix of soap and warm water will do, but always check the temperature before you put your feet in. Careful not to soak your feet as this just makes the skin soggy and more likely to get damaged.

The right shoes and stockings, tights or socks will help keep your feet healthy. As can things like old innersoles, or socks with holes or thick seams.

This is why you need to choose footwear carefully. Our tips should help you find the right footwear in a high street store at a decent price.

This Fare also affect your circulation, which can lead to you Type diabetes foot care less blood supply to your feet. Without a good blood supply card may cre problems diabetez cuts and sores healing. You may also get cramps and pain in your legs or feet. Most foot problems can be prevented with good, regular footcare. During the coronavirus pandemic, some of your routine appointments might be postponed or happening in a different way to usual. We've got more information on what to expect at the moment.

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