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Hypertension and yoga

Hypertension and yoga

Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart Hypertnsion Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis. Other studies Hyperyension yoga to be related to adverse effects if it was practiced too frequently or incorrectly. Saptharishi L, Soudarssanane M, Thiruselvakumar D, Navasakthi D, Mathanraj S, Karthigeyan M, Sahai A. Find out how long it takes to lower blood pressure here.

Hypertension and yoga -

Lengthen your sacrum toward your heels as you elongate your spine. Tuck your chin in slightly to lengthen the back of your neck. Rest your forehead on the floor. With each inhale, feel your ribcage expand out to your thighs, and with each exhale, let your body relax toward the floor.

Stay here for 1—3 minutes. Why it helps with high blood pressure: Seated forward bends can be very calming. For this pose, have several pillows available to stack on your thighs and rest your forehead on if you like. How to practice: Begin in Dandasana Staff Pose , sitting on the floor with your legs out in front of you.

Sit up straight, pressing your heels away from your body and your fingertips into the floor beside your hips. On an exhale, bend forward from your hips, keeping your torso long and your spine straight.

Walk your hands along the outside of your legs, reaching as far as they can go while maintaining the length in your spine. If you can reach them, hold the sides of your feet with your hands.

With each inhalation, lift and lengthen your front torso just slightly; with each exhalation, release a little more fully into the forward bend. How to practice: Take a seat on the ground with your legs straight. Bend your knees and bring the soles of your feet together allowing your knees to fall open.

Your hands can rest on the floor behind you to provide support for your spine, or gently hold your feet. With an inhale, lengthen the spine, reaching up through the crown of your head.

Slide your shoulder blades down and lengthen the back of your neck. Stay for 3—5 breaths, feeling each inhale expand the ribs outward. Why it helps with high blood pressure: Talk about soothing.

This pose not only stretches those super-tight muscles in your back and legs, but it also calms the mind and eases anxiety and fatigue.

How to practice: From a seated position, extend your right leg straight and bend your left knee, placing the bottom of your left foot against your right inner thigh. Sit up on a block or folded blanket if your hamstrings or lower back feel tight. Square your hips forward, and with an inhale reach your arms overhead to lengthen your spine.

On your exhale forward fold over your right leg allowing your hands to lightly hold your right foot or rest on the floor wherever they comfortably land. Press your right heel gently into the floor as you lengthen your chest over the right leg. Keep the back of your neck long and your shoulders relaxed away from the ears.

Focus on long, smooth inhales and exhales. Stay for 3—5 breaths and then switch sides. Why it helps with high blood pressure: Yoga practices that include breath work have been shown to provide the most benefit to your blood pressure.

Lengthening your exhale activates your calming nervous system, relieving stress and lowering your blood pressure. How to practice: Kneel with your legs hip-width distance apart and the tops of your feet pointing straight behind you. Have a block or folded blanket available to sit on for comfort.

Sit back either on the floor between your feet or on a block placed between your feet. Sit tall, reaching the crown of your head up and lengthening the back of your neck. If your feel any knee discomfort, sit higher on additional blocks or blankets.

Rest your hands comfortably on your thighs and allow your eyes to close. Bring your attention to your breath. Notice the length of your inhale and exhale. After a few normal breaths, begin to lengthen your exhale to be a few counts longer than your inhale.

For example, inhale to a count of 4 and exhale to a count of 6. Karmacharya BM, Koju RP, LoGerfo JP, Chan KCG, Mokdad AH, Shrestha A, Sotoodehnia N, Fitzpatrick AL. Awareness, treatment and control of hypertension in Nepal: findings from the Dhulikhel heart study.

Heart Asia. Mehata S, Shrestha N, Mehta R, Vaidya A, Rawal LB, Bhattarai N, Mishra SR. Prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of hypertension in Nepal: data from nationally representative population-based cross-sectional study.

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Effectiveness-implementation hybrid designs: combining elements of clinical effectiveness and implementation research to enhance public health impact. Med Care. Dhungana RR, Khanal MK, Joshi S, Kalauni OP, Shakya A, Bhrutel V, Panthi S, Kc RK, Ghimire B, Pandey AR, et al.

Impact of a structured yoga program on blood pressure reduction among hypertensive patients: study protocol for a pragmatic randomized multicenter trial in primary health care settings in Nepal. BMC Complement Altern Med. Cohen J.

A power primer. Psychol Bull. Murugesan R, Govindarajulu N, Bera T. Effect of selected yogic practices on the management of hypertension. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. CAS PubMed Google Scholar. Saptharishi L, Soudarssanane M, Thiruselvakumar D, Navasakthi D, Mathanraj S, Karthigeyan M, Sahai A.

Community-based randomized controlled trial of non-pharmacological interventions in prevention and control of hypertension among young adults. Subramanian H, Soudarssanane MB, Jayalakshmy R, Thiruselvakumar D, Navasakthi D, Sahai A, Saptharishi L.

Non-pharmacological interventions in hypertension: a community-based cross-over randomized controlled trial. Indian J Community Med. Mizuno J, Monteiro HL. An assessment of a sequence of yoga exercises to patients with arterial hypertension.

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A systematic review and meta-analysis of yoga for hypertension. McCall M. How might Yoga Work? An Overview of Potential Underlying Mechanisms. J Yoga Physical Therap. Riley KE, Park CL. How does yoga reduce stress? A systematic review of mechanisms of change and guide to future inquiry.

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J Psychiatr Res. Pascoe MC, Bauer IE. A systematic review of randomised control trials on the effects of yoga on stress measures and mood. Download references. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to the district implementation team: Mr. Bishnuhari Acharya, Rupandehi; Mr.

Deepak Karki, Ramechap; Dr. Sanker Rijal, Shreeram Acharya, Narendra Kathayet and Shivaraj Jaisey, Surkhet; Ms. Shova Duwadi, Dhading; Dr. Anil Yadav and Ram Krishna Paudel, Nuwakot; Laxmi Sharma and Tulsi Paudel, Kaski; Shriman Pokhrel, Gahendra Hamal, Dwarika Shah and Prem Prakash Hamal, Rolpa.

RRD received the stipend as a Ph. student from Victoria University, Australia which is funded by the Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship. The funding body has no role in the design of the study, the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data and in writing the manuscript.

Institute for Health and Sport, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia. Ramesh Kumar. Nepal Ayurveda Research and Training Center, Kathmandu, Nepal. Patanjali Ayurveda Medical College and Research Center, Dhulikhel, Nepal. Health Faculty, Torrens University, Sydney, Australia. Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Nepal Development Society, Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal. Mitchell Institute for Education and Health Policy, Victoria University, Melbourne, Chitwan, Australia. You can also search for this author in PubMed Google Scholar.

RRD conceptualised and designed the study, analysed the data, interpreted the findings, and prepared the first draft. MKH, SJ, OPK, AS, VB, SP and RKC conceptualised and implemented the study in Surkhet, Dhading, Kaski, Nuwakot, Ramechap, Rolpa and Gulmi respectively.

RRD and BG developed yoga package. RRD and MKK designed the health education module. ARP, BB and SRK developed the implementation plan and executed the study. DN, CSM, ZP and MdC developed the data analysis plan, interpreted the findings and reviewed the draft. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Correspondence to Raja Ram Dhungana. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ethical Review Board of the Nepal Health Research Council Nepal Ref No: , 06 January Before obtaining the written consent from the participants, a team of co-investigators approached them and informed about the purpose, objective, interventions, benefit, risk and outcome of the study.

Besides, they were also informed about their rights to withdraw from the study and the privacy and confidentiality of the data.

Data were stored safely and had restricted access to other than research investigators. Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.

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Reprints and permissions. Dhungana, R. et al. Effects of a health worker-led 3-month yoga intervention on blood pressure of hypertensive patients: a randomised controlled multicentre trial in the primary care setting. BMC Public Health 21 , Download citation. Received : 16 June Accepted : 28 February Published : 20 March Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:.

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Skip to main content. Search all BMC articles Search. Download PDF. Research article Open access Published: 20 March Effects of a health worker-led 3-month yoga intervention on blood pressure of hypertensive patients: a randomised controlled multicentre trial in the primary care setting Raja Ram Dhungana 1 , Zeljko Pedisic 1 , Suira Joshi 2 , Mahesh Kumar Khanal 2 , Om Prakash Kalauni 2 , Anu Shakya 2 , Vijay Bhurtel 2 , Savyata Panthi 2 , K.

Abstract Background Hypertension control remains a major challenge globally. Methods This was a multicentric, two-arm, randomised trial conducted among hypertensive patients in seven Ayurveda Health Centres in Nepal between March and June Methods Trial design This was a multicentric, two-arm, randomised, wait-list controlled, nonblinded trial comparing structured yoga practice alongside health education against health education only over three months.

Study settings The trial was conducted in purposively selected AHCs located in Dhading, Nuwakot, Kaski, Ramechap, Surkhet, Rolpa and Rupandehi districts. Intervention Health Centre based five-day training The first component of the intervention was a five-day training delivered to the intervention group participants at the trial centres.

Two hours of health education In addition to the five-day yoga training session, the participants in the intervention group also received a two-hour health education session.

Outcomes SBP at follow up was the primary outcome of the study. Data collection Data were collected by face-to-face interviews, anthropometric measurements and clinical examinations.

Data analysis The collected data were compiled, edited and entered in Epidata 3. Fidelity assessment of the trial We conducted a post-intervention survey to retrospectively assess the fidelity of intervention. Data and safety monitoring A clinical doctor who led the data monitoring and quality assurance team monitored the implementation of the trial, including participant recruitment and intervention delivery.

Results Intervention effects Data on the primary outcomes were available for a total of participants Fig. Participant flow diagram.

Full size image. Table 1 Baseline characteristics of the participants Full size table. Table 2 Changes in outcome variables from baseline to follow-up Full size table. Table 3 Intervention effects: results of multilevel mixed-effects linear regression Full size table.

Discussion In this multicentre randomised controlled trial, we found that a 3-month yoga intervention reduces systolic and diastolic blood pressure among hypertensive patients. Conclusion A simple, 3-month yoga intervention delivered by health workers in primary care centres and coupled with home-based practice is effective in lowering high blood pressure among hypertensive patients.

Availability of data and materials The datasets and study materials will be available from the corresponding author on request. Abbreviations AHC: Ayurveda Health Centre BMI: Body mass index DBP: Diastolic blood pressure ERB: Ethical Review Board ITT: Intention to treat IQR: Interquartile range MET: Metabolic Equivalent NCD: Non-communicable disease SBP: Systolic blood pressure SD: Standard deviation.

Article Google Scholar Karmacharya BM, Koju RP, LoGerfo JP, Chan KCG, Mokdad AH, Shrestha A, Sotoodehnia N, Fitzpatrick AL. Article Google Scholar Mehata S, Shrestha N, Mehta R, Vaidya A, Rawal LB, Bhattarai N, Mishra SR.

Article CAS Google Scholar Neupane D, Shrestha A, Mishra SR, Bloch J, Christensen B, McLachlan CS, Karki A, Kallestrup P. Article Google Scholar Whelton PK, Carey RM, Aronow WS, Casey DE Jr, Collins KJ, Dennison Himmelfarb C, DePalma SM, Gidding S, Jamerson KA, Jones DW, et al.

Article Google Scholar J-f N, X-f Z, Hu H-t, Wang J-j, Y-l L, Lu D-h. Article Google Scholar Nahas R. PubMed PubMed Central Google Scholar Tyagi A, Cohen M. PubMed Google Scholar Park CL, Braun T, Siegel T. Article Google Scholar Innes KE, Bourguignon C, Taylor AG. Article Google Scholar Deepa T, Sethu G, Thirrunavukkarasu N.

Google Scholar Hartley L, Dyakova M, Holmes J, Clarke A, Lee MS, Ernst E, Rees K. Article Google Scholar Wu Y, Johnson BT, Acabchuk RL, Chen S, Lewis HK, Livingston J, Park CL, Pescatello LS.

Article CAS Google Scholar Wolff M, Sundquist K, Larsson Lonn S, Midlov P. Article Google Scholar Glasgow RE, Lichtenstein E, Marcus AC. Article Google Scholar Curran GM, Bauer M, Mittman B, Pyne JM, Stetler C. Article Google Scholar Dhungana RR, Khanal MK, Joshi S, Kalauni OP, Shakya A, Bhrutel V, Panthi S, Kc RK, Ghimire B, Pandey AR, et al.

Article Google Scholar Cohen J. Article CAS Google Scholar Murugesan R, Govindarajulu N, Bera T. CAS PubMed Google Scholar Saptharishi L, Soudarssanane M, Thiruselvakumar D, Navasakthi D, Mathanraj S, Karthigeyan M, Sahai A.

Article Google Scholar Subramanian H, Soudarssanane MB, Jayalakshmy R, Thiruselvakumar D, Navasakthi D, Sahai A, Saptharishi L. Article Google Scholar Mizuno J, Monteiro HL.

Article Google Scholar Cohen BE, Chang AA, Grady D, Kanaya AM. Article Google Scholar Patel C, North W. Article Google Scholar Hagins M, Selfe T, Innes K. Article Google Scholar Borrelli B. Article Google Scholar Wickersham K, Colbert A, Caruthers D, Tamres L, Martino A, Erlen JA.

Article Google Scholar Cramer H, Haller H, Lauche R, Steckhan N, Michalsen A, Dobos G. Article CAS Google Scholar McCall M. Article Google Scholar Bussing A, Michalsen A, Khalsa SB, Telles S, Sherman KJ. PubMed PubMed Central Google Scholar Pascoe MC, Thompson DR, Jenkins ZM, Ski CF.

Article Google Scholar Pascoe MC, Bauer IE. Article Google Scholar Download references. Acknowledgements We would like to express our sincere gratitude to the district implementation team: Mr. Funding RRD received the stipend as a Ph. View author publications. Ethics declarations Ethics approval and consent to participate Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ethical Review Board of the Nepal Health Research Council Nepal Ref No: , 06 January Consent for publication Not applicable Competing interests None declared.

New research shows qnd risk of infection from Hypertenssion biopsies. Discrimination at work is linked to high Hypertension and yoga pressure. Icy fingers and toes: Poor circulation or Raynaud's phenomenon? I have coronary artery disease and take medications for high blood pressure. I did yoga when I was younger and would like to resume the practice. Hypertension and yoga Standards: The Thomson Reuters Hypertension and yoga Phytochemical composition of superfoods. Thai Airways International said on Wednesday it entered into Green tea extract and liver health agreement with Boeing and GE Aerospace Hypertensiion a Hyperfension order of 45 yogs jets yoba expand its fleet, with deliveries starting in Skip Natural ways to rev up metabolism main content. Exclusive news, data and analytics Anti-anxiety catechins financial market professionals Learn anc about Refinitiv. FILE PHOTO: Attendees perform yoga during an event called "Yoga por la paz" Peace through Yoga before the arrival of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, during a sideline event ahead of the Group 20 summit, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, November 29, Reuters Health - Adults who practice yoga with breathing and relaxation exercises at least three times a week may have lower blood pressure than people who don't, a research review suggests. For the study, researchers analyzed data from 49 trials with a total of 3, participants who were typically middle-aged, overweight women and men who already had high blood pressure or were close to developing the condition.

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